Bible Resources
(Click on link to access)

Bible-Aramaic/English Translation
http://www.thearamaicscriptures.com/

This site provides an Aramaic/English translation of the majority of New Testament scripture (Revelation, 2nd Peter, 2nd & 3rd John are not included).  As stated on the site home page, "This Website features The Holy Aramaic Scriptures, as preserved in the ancient Eastern Aramaic Text of The New Testament, in such manuscripts as The Yonan Codex, The Khabouris Codex, The 1199 Houghton Codex, and The Mingana 148 Codex, for you to read and study; giving as literal as possible a rendering of this Holy Biblical Text, in a fresh, accurate, and literal, English Translation/Transliteration."


Bible-Douay-Rheims Version
http://www.drbo.org/

This online version contains all 73 books, including the seven Deutero-Canonical books. As the introduction states, “The whole Douay-Rheims Bible was revised and diligently compared with the Latin Vulgate by Bishop Richard Challoner in 1749-1752 A.D. The notes included in the text were written by Dr. Challoner.”



The New Testament is presented in a Greek & English interlinear format.  The ISA program is designed for examination of the original. The entire Greek (Ist Century Greek) text has been transferred to consistent etymological and idiomatic English equivalents. It is not necessary to learn Greek or turn up words in a Greek lexicon or look up the grammar, for nearly all this is given in English just under the text itself. The reader receives the same impression as if he were reading the original. In this way the facts of Scripture will be readily accessible to all who understand the English language.


The Old Testament is presented in an interlinear format - Hebrew and English.  The ISA program is designed for examination of the original. The entire Hebrew text has been transferred to consistent etymological and idiomatic English equivalents. It is not necessary to learn Hebrew  or turn up words in a Hebrew lexicon or look up the grammar, for nearly all this is given in English just under the text itself. The reader receives the same impression as if he were reading the original. In this way the facts of Scripture will be readily accessible to all who understand the English language.

Bible-JB Phillips New Testament
http://www.ccel.org/bible/phillips/JBPNT.htm

The 1962 (for schools) the online edition of the JB Phillips includes an more than just an easy to read translation of the New Testament.  Click on the JB Phillips Homepage and find additional links within the site, including Harmony of the New Testament, which follows the story of Jesus through the Gospels broken into 40 parts, by subject and date.  It also looks at the history of the early church through Acts, all 21 letters, and Revelation, by breaking it out in 71 parts by subject and date.  Maps are included.  Lots more available - check it out.



A Translation From the Latin Vulgate in the Light of the Hebrew and Greek Originals is a Catholic version of the Bible in three volumes (later published in one volume editions) translated by Monsignor Ronald Knox, the English theologian, priest, and crime writer. It is more commonly known as the Knox Version. The style of the translation is in idiomatic English and much freer in renderings of passages than the Douay version. With the Deuterocanonical books, the interpretation of the passages was brought closer to the Septuagint. When the Latin appeared to be doubtful, the translation of the text was based on other languages, with the Latin translation placed in the footnote.
 
Templegate Publishers produced a facsimile of the New Testament in 1997 (ISBN 0-87243-229-7). Baronius Press secured the rights for the work from the Diocese of Westminster in 2009 and their new leather bound edition of Monsignor Knox's translation was published in October 2012
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Bible-Latin Vulgate Bible
http://www.latinvulgate.com/

The Latin Vulgate Bible was completed in 405 A.D. by Saint Jerome, acting upon the order of Pope Damasus I given in 382. Accoring to Wikipedia, the Latin Vulgate Bibletakes its name from the phrase versio vulgata, i.e., "the translation made public", and was written in a common 4th century style of literary Latin.” The Vulgate “was the first, and for many centuries the only, Christian Bible with anOld Testestament translated directly from the Hebrew rather than from the Greek Septuagint” (Wikipedia). Latin Vulgate.com is designed to help the user understand the more difficult verses in the Bible. This is accomplished by unsing the original Latin Vulgate as the primary reference, and adding the Douay-Rheims English translation (with commentary), and the King James Version as alternate translations. 



The New American Bible (NAB) provides a direct link to the “Bible” tab within the greater United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) website. The full text of the NAB version of the Bible is provided including footnotes. Three “Preface” sections provide an introduction to the New American Bible, along with a preface to the First Edition, and Revised Edition of the New Testament. Also included are introductory sections to the Pentateuch, the Historical Books, the Wisdom books, the Prophetic books, the Gospels, New Testament Letters, and the Catholic Letters.


Bible-The Five Gospel Parallel
http://sites.utoronto.ca/religion/synopsis/

The site provides the four gospels, the non-canonical Gospel of Thomas, the writings of Paul, and the “Q” source, which can be displayed and cross-referenced in up to a six-frame parallel. One simply clicks on the color-coded link within one frame and the other frames automatically display the related passage. You may need to play with this site a bit to get the hang of it, but it will be well worth the effort.   


Bible-The Message (MSG)
http://www.biblestudytools.com/msg/

The goal of The Message® is to engage people in the reading process and help them understand what they read. This is not a study Bible, but rather "a reading Bible." The original books of the Bible were not written in formal language. The Message® tries to recapture the Word in the words we use today.


Bible-The New Jerusalem Bible
http://www.catholic.org/bible/

The New Jerusalem Bible (NJB) is a Catholic translation of the Bible published in 1985.   It's General Editor, The Very Reverend Dom (Joseph) Henry Wansbrough, OSB, MA, STL, LSS was my New Testament professor at Oxford University in 2007 and is a well know biblical scholar.  Among his many honors, he served on the Pontifical Biblical Commission and the Catholic Biblical Association.

The New Jerusalem Bible (NJB) has become the most widely used Roman Catholic Bible outside of the United States.  Like its predecessor, the Jerusalem Bible, the New Jerusalem Bible (NJB) version is translated "directly from the Hebrew, Greek or Aramaic." The 1973 French translation, the Bible de Jerusalem, is followed only "where the text admits to more than one interpretation." Introductions and notes, with some modifications, are taken from the Bible de Jerusalem.



Through compelling narratives, poetry, and teaching, The Voice invites readers to enter into the whole story of God, enabling them to hear God speaking and to experience His presence in their lives. Through a collaboration of nearly 120 biblical scholars, pastors, writers, musicians, poets, and artists, The Voice recaptures the passion, grit, humor, and beauty that is often lost in the translation process. The result is a retelling of the story of the Bible in a form as fluid as modern literary works yet painstakingly true to the original manuscripts.  The Voice Bible is a publication of the Ecclesia Bible Society and accessed through BibleGateway.com.  You can either search by Bible passage, keyword and topic.  Or click on "Bible Book List" for a Book & Chapter search.  


Bible-World Wide Study Bible
http://www.ccel.org/wwsb/

The World Wide Study Bible is made available by the Christian Classics Ethereal Library and Calvin College.  Version 5 (updated 8/18/2006) includes all the books of the Bible (Catholic and Protestant). According to their website, "there is a new set of verse-level links. There are too many book references to display them for a whole chapter, so we display them only when you click on a verse number. In general, you'll see references that are more specific to the verse you are interested in, and more of them. There are about 50,000 chapter-level references and 850,000 verse-level references in the database." The site has been under reconstruction since 1999. There are links to various versions of the scripture (including some audio texts), commentary (primarily Protestant sources), sermons, notes, and poetry.